a new phase of RWSN is on the way…..

2015 Theme Icons

RWSN is not a formal organisation, more of a shared idea. In 1992, the network was founded as the Handpump Technology Network (HTN) with a narrow focus on…. handpump technology. 22 years on, and this small group of engineers from the Water & Sanitation Program of the World Bank, UNICEF, Skat and the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) has become a much bigger family.

As of this morning we have 6,301 individual members, 23 RWSN Member Organisations (the newest are Yobe State Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Agency, Nigeria and the German-based NGO, Welthungerhilfe) and we have an active team of thematic leaders from Skat, WaterAid and IRC as well as a tremendously supportive Executive Committee.

So where now?

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Launched today: the Guidelines for Resolution of Problems with Water Systems

Originally posted on Improve International:

By Susan M. Davis, Executive Director

Improvement International 8.5 X 11 Newsletter-PRINTToday we are proud to launch the report on Guidelines for Resolution of Problems with Water Systems. This report addresses a widely ignored question in international development: what should be done when an implementing organization finds out (e.g., through post-implementation monitoring) that a water system they built is no longer providing services?  Rehabilitation of infrastructure, the common response, if any, is not enough.

Ideally, resolution activities should be a bridge to sustained, locally-led services. While implementing organizations have a responsibility at a certain level, the goal is for governments to lead the way in ensuring water services for everyone in their countries. These guidelines, approaches, and models are intended to move implementing organizations toward that common goal.

The ultimate goal of these guidelines is to encourage actions that will improve the probability of sustained water services for people in developing countries.

We are…

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Why water systems fail part 15: inappropriate technology

Originally posted on Improve International:

By Susan Davis, Executive Director

What leads to success or failure of water systems?  Everything we read points to a complex mix of factors.  In this series, we share quotes on various topics related to failure of water systems from our literature search and interviews for the report on resolution of problems with water systems as a way to highlight pieces of the puzzle.

This blog focuses on inappropriate technology choices as a cause of water point failure. This is due in part to a lack of technology standards in some developing countries, or by implementing organizations not following the standards. Technology might be too difficult to repair (perhaps because of the lack of tools or spare parts), not durable enough for the environment, or of poor quality.

Despite agreement among [30 water and sanitation development professionals] that the issues are social and institutional rather than technical, poor technology choice…

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Why water systems fail part 14: lack of spare parts

Originally posted on Improve International:

By Susan Davis, Executive Director

What leads to success or failure of water systems?  Everything we read points to a complex mix of factors.  In this series, we share quotes on various topics related to failure of water systems from our literature search and interviews for the report on resolution of problems with water systems as a way to highlight pieces of the puzzle.

This blog focuses on a factor that contributes to the inability to repair rural water systems: the lack of supply chains for spare parts, tools and water treatment products.

Another point that we also see is the issue [with sustainability], is spare parts availability. Even though the ownership is there and people want to do something but they … have to travel a long distance to find the spare parts. They would already spend a huge amount of money just to travel there and buy the…

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Why water systems fail part 13: users don’t want to pay

Originally posted on Improve International:

By Susan Davis, Executive Director

What leads to success or failure of water systems?  Everything we read points to a complex mix of factors.  In this series, we share quotes on various topics related to failure of water systems from our literature search and interviews for the report on resolution of problems with water systems as a way to highlight pieces of the puzzle.

This blog focuses on the unwillingness of some water users to pay for services, a major contributor to problems with cost recovery.  The reasons behind this vary, and include users not liking the taste of the water, not trusting the people collecting the fees, or not wanting to pay for something that was free before. Even if life-cycle costs are well defined, it is still important to understand what users are willing to pay for.

In Liberia it rains almost constantly for about six months…

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Addressing failure in rural water supply in Africa – how we can all do better (Video)

In his key note speech, Professor Richard Carter urged the delegation at the 41st IAH Congress to do more to explain why groundwater matters and why hydrogeological science is important.

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